Politicians often support policies that they indirectly benefit from. One example of this is supporting legislation or various forms of deregulation that has a populous bend to it. The kind of policies that set this individual apart from the political establishment. Typically, the politicians that support such policies tend to operate within the context of a Bootleggers and Baptist dynamic.

However,  these attempts to garner public support through supporting policies that attack the status quo are not the typical B&B dynamic. Much of the time these actors (the politicians)  economize the benefits on two fronts. Supporting their ideological agenda and securing firm endorsements from their constituency. Meaning that as economic agents in the marketplace of ideas, they operate as dual-role actors. Effectively they operate as the Bootlegger and the Baptists simultaneously. Through advocating for a specific policy position, the outspoken politician operates as a Baptist. They stress the moral and technical concerns of a specific stance on policy. Whether it is AOC advocating for the Green New Deal or Rand Paul arguing for term limits, both positions take on a moral dimension. For this very reason, both economic actors in the political sphere are Baptists.

But we would be remiss to assume that they also do not take on the role of Bootlegger concurrently. Why? I will give both Rand Paul and AOC the benefit of the doubt and assume the defense of their ideological pet projects is sincere. The economic agent’s sincere belief in the moral aspects of their advocacy is a crucial contingency for it being a true Dual-Role actor dynamic. All because some are sincere in their moral arguments for tax cuts (for example) doesn’t mean they do not stand to benefit.  Neither Dr. Paul nor AOC benefits monetarily from supporting policies that are popular among common people. The most conspicuous benefit is both political figures getting re-elected for another term. However, what they stand to gain through “pollical popularity” extends well beyond merely keeping their sear in the House or the Senate. In the age of social media, politicians now have a very different kind of relationship with their constituents. With platforms such as Twitter, there is a much higher degree of personal interaction. The days of listening to your public figure from afar as they pontific upon public policy at the podium (political pulpit) are over. The voter can now to a limited degree interact with their elected officials on social media. Many of them have amassed something of Fanclub on various social media platforms. Their social media presence has permanently shifted the dynamic between politicians and voters. Various political leaders are now being quoted, re-Twitted, and immortalized in internet memes at a mind-boggling magnitude. One only needs to remember the emergency of the Bernie Bros to see in current times the line between celebrity and political renown have been blurred. Formulating a subculture of political celebrity. That could have never existed without the on-ramp of cyberspace.

The cult of personality has morphed into a political bastardization of celebrity culture, politicians have quite a bit to gain through maintaining a positive image. These figures now carry social currency with people outside of their constituency. You have people in Hawaii following Rand Paul on Twitter and he is a senator for the state of Kentucky! Political forces such as Paul and AOC  carry enough populous clout they have mobilized political activism across the country. Their influence extends well beyond the jurisdiction of the state they represent. This is how they truly benefit! They reap the rewards of advocating for policies that concern the public. If James M. Buchanan was correct politics is a form of exchange. In most cases (except bribery, welfare programs, and subsidies) money is not being exchanged.  One of the most obvious examples of the non-monetary exchange in politics is log-rolling. Politicians trading votes in the House or Senate. However, the social currency earned through supporting policies popular among the public such as term limits is a different kind of exchange. The politician gives lips service to policies that benefit the average person. In exchange, you get the support of the people. The catallactics of this trade-off is quite salient once you give it some thought.   

4 thoughts on “Bootleggers and Baptists XV: Term Limits

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