thoughtful diverse coworkers watching laptop screen discussing project at meeting
Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

 

 

Machiavelli could easily be considered one of the most misinterpreted thinkers in political philosophy. His name has become synonymous deceit and other vices of public office. This marred image of Machiavelli has sullied his reputation as a philosopher for centuries. Despite Machiavelli’s image problem, his insights extend well beyond the provincial mode of retaining tyrannical authority. He expounded upon immutable truths about human nature. Truths that need to be acknowledged anytime you are navigating any kind of social hierarchy. Whether naturally developed or systematically contrived.

 

By Machiavelli conveying these truths in his works of political philosophy, he distinguishes himself on a deeper level than a mere political theorist. Rather, he transcends that restrictive title. Embarks upon detailing the more convoluted and perplexing realm of human nature. His observations at times even veer into the territory of practical advice.  Hence why the application of his work isn’t just limited to the sly trickery that characterized the Florentine royal court back in the 16th century.

 

In terms of applying  Machiavelli’s lessons to the workplace, this insight is a unique one. That requires some abstract thinking to foresee the application but conceptually is similar enough that it works. This is about hiring managers utilizing contracted employees from employment agencies. This is colloquially known as “using temps” or temporary employees. Some individuals may question what hiring temps over fully company employees has to do with mercenaries. Hiring mercenaries is something that Machiavelli advises all shrewd rulers to avoid doing so.

And by experience one sees that only princes and armed republics make very great progress; nothing but harm ever comes from mercenary arms. And a republic armed with its arms is brought to obey one of its citizens with more …. (Machiavelli, 1532, P.50. Trans. Mansfield 1985) [1].

 

And because with these examples, I have come into Italy, which has been governed
for many years by mercenary arms, I want to discourse on them more deeply, so that, when their origin and progress have been seen, one can correct them better. (Machiavelli, 1532, P.52. Trans. Mansfield 1985) [2].

 

Let him, then, who wants to be unable to win make use of these arms, since they are much more dangerous than mercenary arms. For with these, ruin is accomplished; they are all united, all resolved to obey someone else. But mercenary arms, when they have won, need more time and greater opportunity to hurt you since they are not one whole body and have been found and paid for by you. (Machiavelli, 1532, P.55. Trans. Mansfield 1985) [3].

 

All three quotes from The Prince exemplifies the perils of hiring soldiers. At the end of the day, the soldier of fortunate only has his eyes set on fortune. There isn’t any sense of pride, heritage, community, kinship, or other forms of social cohesion bonding them to the kingdom they have been paid to defend. Even if native-born soldiers are receiving a salary and other benefits (in the modern era; health insurance, education) they still have a bond to the country they defend. They joined the military out of nationalist or patriotic convictions.  There is more of an emotional and philosophical bond to there defense of the homeland. Money can motivate people to do unfathomable things. To truly and consciously commit to taking a bullet for a cause is an act based upon strong convictions. This is the kind of loyalty that cannot be bought. Some historians have even speculated about the folly of England utilizing Hessian mercenaries in the Revolutionary War. Ultimately, providing some credence to the assertions of Machiavelli.

 

Temporary workers hired from an employment agency provide similar issues. From my observations, temps tend to be fired for much more frivolous reasons than full employees. If you are hired directly, in most instances, your boss will understand if you are having car trouble. If you are a temp you could very well be fired over the incident. If you were directly hired by the company you would be subject to the rules listed in the “employee handbook”.Such document details policies that provide specific parameters for proper conduct. Meaning you can be three times versus once before you are terminated. Temps are technically considered employees of the employment agency. So they are not insulated by these measures. Paralleling the premise of being paid to be a foreign soldier.

 

The pretense of lacking stability and lack of uniform policies for temps skews incentives away from productivity. We all know that “temp-to-hire” arrangements are an exercise in carrot dangling. Your manager doesn’t ever treat you like part of the team. What is the point in killing yourself for a company that will never outright hire you? It presents a problem of mutual investment. The employer doesn’t feel invested in the temporary employee. The temporary employee does not feel invested in the company.  Creating a disconnection that is a very similar dynamic to that of mercenaries. A lack of connection and commitment does not yield good results.

 

 

 

5 thoughts on “Machiavelli in the Office – Part VI- Don’t Hire Mercenaries

  1. I am enjoying how you are applying the lessons of “The Prince” to the contemporary business world. Perhaps one day you could publish an annotated version of Machiavelli’s classic tome under a revised title, such as “The Business Prince” or “The Manager”?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is funny that you mentioned that. The thought did cross my mind. After reading my blog post on the Abilene paradox. I would have to persuade a publisher to give a novice author a chance.

      Are you sure you don’t have a marketing background? You seem to have a real skill for coming up with these ideas. I personally struggle with titles.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I don’t know anything about marketing, but among other things, I was a Spanish literature major in college, and what I like to call “the law of ideas” (intellectual property rights) is the centerpiece of my business law course!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. The whole marketing comment was partly a joke. I suppose having a strong understanding IP will help in terms of providing clear limitations on creative endeavors influenced by the work of others.

          I suppose I should clarify upon my reference to my Abilene Paradox essay. The Abilene Paradox taught me that you need a good allegory to bring management principles to life. If you are able to craft a simple but compelling narrative it will be golden.

          For the record, I do not have any authority to be writing about management principles in any serious sense. Then again that is true of everything subject I write about on this blog.

          Then again, how many of the self-help gurus are in any position to be pontificating about career advancement. My sophist-meter goes off whenever I pass the self-help section in any bookstore.

          I should distinguish the self-help crowd is completely separate from real management experts. I greatly respect the work of Jerry B. Harvey.

          Liked by 1 person

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